English

Fused Sentence example: What It Means and How To Fix Them

When reading, you can often pick up on awkward grammatical constructions. These are known as fused sentences. They result when two ideas are joined together in a sentence but don’t have their own sentence. Fused sentences example aren’t necessarily incorrect or bad; they just need to be broken up into two or more separate sentences to make the meaning clearer to the reader. Let’s take a look at some examples of fused sentences and see how we can fix them.

What is a fused sentence?

A fused sentence is when two thoughts are joined together as if they’re one – but they don’t have a period at the end of the sentence. Fused sentences are problematic because they can be hard to understand. If you have a fused sentence, think about breaking it up into two sentences, one for each thought. This will make your writing clearer and easier to read. Just remember, a fused sentence isn’t necessarily incorrect. It just requires more careful editing to make the meaning clearer.

Examples of fused sentences.

Let’s take a look at some examples of fused sentences and see how we can fix them.

  • Bad: They were both so tired that they went to bed early.
  • Better: They were both so tired that they went to bed early.
  • Bad: The city has a thriving arts scene, so it’s a great place for artists to live.
  • Better: The city has a thriving arts scene, so it’s a great place for artists to live.
  • Bad: The new law is supposed to be helpful, but many people don’t understand it.
  • Better: The new law is supposed to be helpful, but many people don’t understand it.

Fused sentences in dialogue.

Sometimes you’ll see fused sentences in dialogue. This is particularly common in Hollywood screenplay style, but it’s also not uncommon in fiction writing. If you want to write like this, go ahead – but just know that you’ll need to carefully edit your work. If you want to write like this, but aren’t sure how to do it, you can use our screenplay templates.

For example: “I’m glad you’re here,” she said. “I’ve been waiting for you.” This sentence is fine, but if the dialogue doesn’t slow down the scene, consider using two sentences instead.

For example: “I’m glad you’re here,” she said. “I’ve been waiting for you.”

Types of fused sentences.

There are several types of fused sentences. Let’s take a look at some examples.

Absolute fused sentence: This is when two sentences are joined with a comma but without a coordinating conjunction.

For example, one sentence ends with “They were both so tired that they went to bed early,” and the next sentence begins with “The city has a thriving arts scene.” This would be considered one fused sentence. – Coordinate fused sentence: This is when two sentences are joined with a comma and a coordinating conjunction.

For example, one sentence ends with “They were both so tired that they went to bed early,” and the next sentence begins with “The city has a thriving arts scene.” However, you’ll see that there is a comma after “The city has a thriving arts scene.” This would be considered one fused sentence. – Complex fused sentence: One sentence is a main clause and the other is an unnecessary addition.

For example, one sentence ends with “The city has a thriving arts scene,” and the next sentence begins with “It’s a great place for artists to live.” Both ideas are part of the same sentence, but the second idea (“It’s a great place for artists to live”) is unnecessary. – Periodic fused sentence: This is when a sentence is written as if it has two different subjects but is about one subject.

For example, one sentence ends with “They were both so tired that they went to bed early.” The next sentence begins with “The city has a thriving arts scene.” However, these two sentences are talking about the same thing. They’re both talking about the city.

When to use fused sentences.

While you should try to avoid fused sentences, they’re not always bad. If you’re going for a particular style or if you’re writing a poem, then they might be exactly what you’re looking for. However, if you’re writing nonfiction, you need to be careful. Readers often find fused sentences hard to understand, so if your writing has them, you’ll want to go back and edit them.

Fused sentences are particularly common when writers are trying to sound more authoritative or write in a certain style. You might see them in academic papers, newspapers, and blog posts. It’s important to be careful when using fused sentences, especially when writing for a general audience.

Fused sentences with a conjunction.

You might see a fused sentence with a conjunction in formal academic papers.

For example: “They were both so tired that they went to bed early, and the city has a thriving arts scene.” You might see this in formal academic papers or in blog posts. Although you might see a fused sentence with a conjunction in formal blog posts or academic papers, it’s not appropriate for fiction writing or creative nonfiction. Most readers expect to see a full sentence with a subject and a verb in every paragraph.

Fused sentences with a comma.

You might see a fused sentence with a comma in academic papers or formal documents.

For example: “They were both so tired that they went to bed early, The city has a thriving arts scene, it’s a great place for artists to live.” Although this is technically a fused sentence, you might see it in formal writing. Generally speaking, fused sentences with a comma are perfectly fine. However, you should be careful when using them. If you have a fused sentence with a comma, then it’s important to use a comma in both parts of the sentence.

For example: “They were both so tired that they went to bed early, they barely had enough energy to eat dinner.”

Fused sentences with NO comma.

This is the worst type of fused sentence. You’ll see this in academic papers, newspapers, and other formal documents.

For example: “The city has a thriving arts scene, it’s a great place for artists to live.” This is the most difficult fused sentence to understand. If you have a fused sentence with no comma,

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button